I am often asked to speak at conferences about innovation, the LEGO turnaround, consumer-led or lead user innovation, digital transformation and the like. Below is a useful collection of useful white papers I have written that summarise some of my thinking and experiences from over the years. The first two I wrote as part of my TRIUM MBA program and the four research reports I co-wrote with our academic experts at the LEGO Learning Institute.

Consumer-driven Innovation: Finding the right consumer-centered innovation methods Download

This paper helps you navigate the different methods and approaches for involving consumers in your innovation process, including a way to diagnose whether the nature of your innovation opportunity would benefit from such input early on. It further explains the LEGO innovation model that can serve as a useful tool for discussing the innovation profiles of different projects in your development pipeline. The white paper is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. so feel free to share and be inspired.

 

 

Consumer Driven Innovation part II: Using technology to fuel real-time feedback and innovation Download

This paper is a follow-on from the previous one, adding the real-time feedback loop dimension to your innovation process. It explains how consumer centricity needs to be embedded in company culture and supported by an ongoing connection, using technology to add size, scale and speed to learning about consumer experience in a way that highlights new innovation opportunities and is a way to judge the efficacy of the current value proposition. This is becoming increasingly important for companies to master as social media pervades more and more of the sales funnel and purchasing process. This paper is also available under the creative commons license.

Defining Systematic Creativity (2008)

co-written with Prof. Edith Ackermann, of the MIT Media Lab and Prof. David Gauntlett of University of Westminster.

This report explores what constitutes creativity, the role of systems in creativity, the role of playful learning and how to become more creative.


 Defining Systematic Creativity>>

Defining Systematic Creativity in the Digital Realm (2009)

co-written with Prof. Edith Ackermann of the MIT Media Lab, Prof. David Gauntlett of University of Westminster and Dr. Thomas Wolbers of University of Edinburgh.

This report builds on the previous on and explore what creativity is in the digital realm, what it is like to grow up digital and how the digital realm is influencing how children play, learn and create. It investigates the similarities and differences between physical and virtual — as well as ‘analogue’ and digital – play, learning and creativity. Furthermore it outlines what the role of systems and platforms are in supporting play, creativity and learning and how blending the physical and digital LEGO® idea enables systematic creativity through immersive play, learning and creative experiences for children of all ages.

Defining Systematic Creativity in the Digital Realm>>

The Future of Play: Defining the role and value of play in the 21st century (2010)

co-written with Prof. Edith Ackermann of the MIT Media Lab, Prof. David Gauntlett of University of Westminster, Prof. David Whitebread of University of Cambridge and Dr. Thomas Wolbers of University of Edinburgh.

This report explores the benefits of play, the many ways of playing and the relevance of the different types of play for child development and the stimulation of adults. The report highlights the deep connections between play, learning and creativity and how the foundations for this are laid in children’s play, furthermore showing how play, regardless of age, remains an essential ingredient in how we fuel our creativity and capacity as learners.

Future of Play>>

The Future of Learning (2011)

co-written with Prof. Edith Ackermann of the MIT Media Lab, Prof. David Gauntlett of University of Westminster, Prof. David Whitebread of University of Cambridge, Dr. Thomas Wolbers of University of Edinburgh and Bo Stjerne Thomsen, also of the LEGO Learning Institute.

This report pulls together the latest findings in neuroscience, psychology and pedagogy and explores how our experience of the world becomes the foundation for learning, how our notions of our own abilities affect learning, how our senses affect how we remember what we have learned, and the role of supportive social relationships and contexts for learning. The report outlines a framework for the future of learning and explains the critical elements that are involved in how the act of learning becomes a creative pursuit.

Future of Learning>>

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